There Ain’t No Strings On Me! Wireless Digital Radiography in Veterinary Medicine

There are still many veterinarians today who do not have the benefit of digital radiography in their hospitals. The majority have indeed made the move into digital over the last 10 years but there remains a remnant of veterinarians who still use film. Most of these film users claim that they are waiting for the price of DR to come down. This excuse is preposterous in my opinion.

Veterinary Digital Radiography at Basic User Level (Tethered DR Panel + New X-ray Table):

Any veterinarian practicing small animal medicine exclusively can add a digital radiography system (and a brand-new x-ray table) to their hospital for a little less than $60.00 per day.

 

Total Equipment Cost (includes tax and freight)

$66,000.00 US

5 Year Equipment Loan with Interest at 6.0%

$1,276.00 US – Monthly Payment

X-ray Fee

$125.00 / 3 Views

Minimum Monthly Caseload (3 view studies)

11 Cases / Month – Break Even Point

If your veterinary hospital is open for business 7am to 6pm for 6 days each week this calculates into the DR system costing you $53.17 US, each day that you are open for business. Not bad!!!

 

New Technology: Wireless Digital Radiography for Veterinarians

Wireless DR technology is a perfect investment for all veterinarians. It works very well for those who work in zoos, wildlife preserves, and mixed animal veterinary hospitals. Typically, these “forgotten veterinarians” have been required to purchase at least two different flat panel systems (one portable and one stationery) if they wanted to truly be digital throughout all species. The other choices would include purchasing a CR unit (cassette based) or just buying digital for small animals and using film for everything else. These complicated scenarios, I am happy to report, no longer hold true.

Wireless digital radiography is market ready and a few hundred of these wireless systems have already been sold and installed. One portable wireless DR panel can now be used to take instant radiographs on horses, cattle, goats, sheep, dogs, cats, birds, reptiles and many more species. The first wireless DR panels were launched around 2011 or 2012, and they have vastly improved in design and reliability since then. The first generation of wireless panels had some trouble with interference from outside signals such as cell phones and electrical grids. An abbreviated battery life was another challenge with the first-generation wireless panels. The highly-paid propeller heads in Asia and Silicon Valley have eliminated most (if not virtually all) of the bugs from wireless technologies and this includes digital flat panels. Most buyers are now purchasing their second digital system and leaving technologies like Film, CR, and CCD in the past which is exactly where they belong. Wireless digital flat panels are no longer the future, they are here!

 

Advantages of Wireless vs. Tethered

NO MORE WIRES – Wireless panels do not need to be wired into and timed (synced) with x-ray tubes and generators. All wireless DR panels now have what is called Auto-Timing. The panel senses the x-ray photons and automatically opens to receive them to produce an image. Furthermore, if a veterinarian is seeing many equine or food animal patients, this unit will not have wires that have the potential to become tangled or in the way.

PORTABILITY – Unlike some of the tethered systems, wireless panels can be connected (paired) to both a laptop PC and a desktop acquisition stations. This makes the wireless digital solution much more compact and portable within a hospital and away from the hospital. Another advantage to this portability is intraoperative imaging in the surgery suite. Veterinarians who perform orthopedic surgeries can now bring the wireless panel into surgery, utilize a sterile panel sleeve, and snap radiographs to ensure the proper placement of hardware. Never again will a surgeon need to move the patient into radiology during surgery. Many surgeons are using CR in surgery, which means there is a delay in snapping the radiograph and then seeing it due to the digitizing process. A wireless DR panel produces an image almost instantly, no waiting.

IMAGE QUALITY – This is a draw at minimum but I still consider that an advantage. I would challenge any veterinarian or veterinary radiologist to determine whether a set of radiographic images were created from a wireless DR panel or a traditional tethered DR panel. The wireless DR panels produce high quality, diagnostically crisp images just like many of their tethered counterparts.       

Question: Which images came from Wireless DR panels?

 

Answer: Both of them were taken by a wireless DR panel. 

Disadvantages of Wireless vs. Tethered

PURCHASE PRICE – Wireless DR technology is indeed more expensive than the tethered DR systems. On the low end, we see a wireless system selling for about $60,000.00 US and the higher end they can cost up to $80,000.00 US. This may scare some of the film users but it is not as likely to scare those practitioners who are buying their second or third DR system.

CYCLE TIME – Some of the wireless systems will take a little longer to cycle and reset between shots versus the tethered systems. This slower cycle time seems to only be problematic with selenium based panels during an equine pre-purchase exam. Many equine veterinarians will push DR systems to their limit in cycle time when taking up to 40 images during a pre-purchase exam at a big event such as the Keenland Sale. However, a slower cycle time is really of no consequence when taking only a 3-5 views on a single patient.

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Making the Wireless DR Purchase

What does it take to remove the fear and anxiety from this purchase? Let’s start with simple math.

Scenario #1 – Purchasing a high-end wireless DR system with a laptop & desktop station

Equipment Cost (includes tax and freight)

$80,000.00 US

5 Year Equipment Loan with Interest at 6.0%

$1,550.00 US – Monthly Payment

X-ray Fee

$125.00 / 3 Views

Minimum Monthly Case Load (3 view studies)

13 Cases / Month – Break Even Point

$64.59 US per day of operation

Scenario #2 – Purchasing the lower-end wireless DR system with only a laptop station.

Equipment Cost (includes tax and freight)

$65,000.00 US

5 Year Equipment Loan with Interest at 6.0%

$1,260.00 US – Monthly Payment

X-ray Fee

$125.00 / 3 Views

Minimum Monthly Case Load (3 view studies)

10 Cases / Month – Break Even Point

$52.50 US per day of operation

Most 2 doctor hospitals will take 20-30 x-ray case studies per month with digital. With that said, there are some veterinarians who rely heavily on radiographic studies to get answers and there are others who do not use x-ray to its fullest potential. I plan to address this tale of two veterinarians in a future blog, so please stay tuned.

Purchasing a wireless DR system is not out of the realm of possibility simply because of the cost. If your hospital is already seeing over 10 patients each month through the x-ray suite and you are charging the proper fees, adding a wireless system is not a difficult decision.

Which of these are from a wireless DR system?

Answer: The one on the left, with the two screws in the hoof block. The one one the right is taken by a tethered DR system. 

Who Makes Them?

There are several wireless DR systems for sale in the veterinary market place today. I am pleased to report that those I have experience with are good systems hailing from good manufacturers who all have track records of sales and support dating back over 10 years.

I can only speak about these certain manufacturers so please understand I am leaving a few others off this list simply because I know very little about their systems.

Canon (multiple dealers in veterinary)

RadmediX (1 exclusive dealer in veterinary)

 

These manufacturers make a good wireless DR panel and they do a good job supporting their panels after the sale.

 Which of these are from a wireless DR system?

Answer: The one on the right is from a wireless DR system. 

Decision Time

Yes! You can own a wireless DR system and you won’t be finding yourself broke and living under a bridge! Be fearless and embrace this wonderful technology. I always say that veterinarians can get a nice bunch of “new friends” any time they begin wondering the trade shows and asking dealers about equipment. Please understand that not all equipment sales reps are used car salesmen…even though many act like it. Understand that the vast majority of these sales people know very little about the technical application of what they are selling. They are all highly trained to do one thing…getting you to sign their proposal. Please know that you do not have make your decision alone. I have many years of experience in buying, selling, and using imaging technology in veterinary hospitals. Contact me when you are ready and I will be your wingman. Please leave a comment and visit our website at www.vitalrads.com. I appreciate the fact that you took precious time from your day to read this blog.

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What’s Next?

In March, I will showcase computed tomography (CT) in the general vet practice. Heads up! CT units are being carpet bombed into general veterinary hospitals all over the USA. I will outline the technology and teach you what to look out for from vendors. Stay tuned.

-RW

Spes et fides sans peur! 

 

 

 

Author: lifebelowthe30

"I'm Just a dude south of the 30th parallel allowing my musings to escape my thick skull." Robert W. Whitaker is a seasoned veterinary technologist with over 20 years experience in veterinary diagnostic imaging. Ultrasound, X-ray and CT are his specialties. Mr. Whitaker is the managing partner of Instruction Intelligence, LLC and the Director of Sales for VitalRads Veterinary Radiology.

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